SOUTH DAKOTA

Cases: 41

Deaths: 1

Government directives: Gov. Kristi Noem ordered “enclosed retail business that promotes public gatherings” to suspend or modify business practices as recommended by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance that involve 10 or more people where separation of 6 feet or more is not possible.

 

MONTANA

Cases: 71

Deaths: Not available

Government directives: On March 24, Gov. Steve Bullock extended closures and mandated social distancing until April 10, including all schools, nonessential social and recreational gatherings of individuals outside of a home more than 10 people and within a 6-foot distance from one another. Montana is also preparing for a potential surge of patients needing hospital care.

 

UTAH

Cases: 346

Deaths: 1

Government directives: The state ordered restaurants, bars to suspend dine-in services to slow the spread of the virus and issued an extension March 23 on K-12 and technical college dismissal to extend through May 1.

 

COLORADO

Cases: 1,068

Deaths: 19

Government directives: Colorado is on a statewide stay-at-home order, requiring people to stay at home unless they are engaged in certain necessary activities. All but necessary travel is prohibited.

 

NEW YORK

Cases: 30,811

Deaths: Not available

Government directives: All non-essential workers (100%) are directed to work from home, and everyone is required to maintain a 6-foot distance in public, according to the New York Department of Health.

 

CALIFORNIA

Cases: 2,535

Deaths: 53

Government directives: California is on a statewide stay-at-home order except as needed to maintain continuity of operation of the federal critical infrastructure sectors.

 

FLORIDA

Cases: 2,355

Deaths: 28

Government directives: Gov. Ron DeSantis signed an executive order March 23 requiring anyone traveling from an area with substantial community spread (including New York, Connecticut and New Jersey) isolate or quarantine for 14 days from the time of entry. Failure to comply results in a possible misdemeanor offense.

 

Editor’s note: This information was taken from each state’s departments of health websites as of 10 a.m. March 26.

 

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