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Envisioning a new North Main

New North MainSHERIDAN – Members of the Sheridan City Council were briefed Wednesday on the findings of a recent initiative aimed at taking stock of residents’ design ideas for the new Interstate 90 interchange at North Main Street.

With construction set to begin sometime in the next several years, city officials said their findings were vitally important in allowing the community to work with the Wyoming Department of Transportation in creating a new gateway to Sheridan that both beautifies the cityscape and sets the stage for continued economic development.

Following a presentation by Public Works Director Nic Bateson, Mayor Dave Kinskey said he believed residents’ feedback was thoroughly incorporated into the report that was recently presented to WYDOT by the city.

“We feel confident we’ve tapped into a broad cross-section,” Kinskey said.

The report was based largely on a three-day series of stakeholder meetings hosted last October by the city and the nonprofit North Main Association. Officials from the Sonoran Institute and the Colorado-based Russell + Mills Studios were also on hand to organize residents’ ideas and transform them into detailed artist renderings of what the new interchange might look like.

Those renderings included features such as a tree-lined entrance to the city, pathway extensions, infrastructure improvements and the construction of a new park that both welcomes visitors and furthers a sort of visual brand for Sheridan.

WYDOT announced in 2010 that the interchange would be relocated roughly three quarters of a mile north of its current location. An official construction start date has yet to be determined, but Bateson told councilors that city staffers’ goal in creating their report was to preempt WYDOT’s design process in order to maximize local say in the project.

SHERIDAN – Members of the Sheridan City Council were briefed Wednesday on the findings of a recent initiative aimed at taking stock of residents’ design ideas for the new Interstate 90 interchange at North Main Street.

With construction set to begin sometime in the next several years, city officials said their findings were vitally important in allowing the community to work with the Wyoming Department of Transportation in creating a new gateway to Sheridan that both beautifies the cityscape and sets the stage for continued economic development.

Following a presentation by Public Works Director Nic Bateson, Mayor Dave Kinskey said he believed residents’ feedback was thoroughly incorporated into the report that was recently presented to WYDOT by the city.

“We feel confident we’ve tapped into a broad cross-section,” Kinskey said.

The report was based largely on a three-day series of stakeholder meetings hosted last October by the city and the nonprofit North Main Association. Officials from the Sonoran Institute and the Colorado-based Russell + Mills Studios were also on hand to organize residents’ ideas and transform them into detailed artist renderings of what the new interchange might look like.

Those renderings included features such as a tree-lined entrance to the city, pathway extensions, infrastructure improvements and the construction of a new park that both welcomes visitors and furthers a sort of visual brand for Sheridan.

WYDOT announced in 2010 that the interchange would be relocated roughly three quarters of a mile north of its current location. An official construction start date has yet to be determined, but Bateson told councilors that city staffers’ goal in creating their report was to preempt WYDOT’s design process in order to maximize local say in the project.

SHERIDAN – Members of the Sheridan City Council were briefed Wednesday on the findings of a recent initiative aimed at taking stock of residents’ design ideas for the new Interstate 90 interchange at North Main Street.

With construction set to begin sometime in the next several years, city officials said their findings were vitally important in allowing the community to work with the Wyoming Department of Transportation in creating a new gateway to Sheridan that both beautifies the cityscape and sets the stage for continued economic development.

Following a presentation by Public Works Director Nic Bateson, Mayor Dave Kinskey said he believed residents’ feedback was thoroughly incorporated into the report that was recently presented to WYDOT by the city.

“We feel confident we’ve tapped into a broad cross-section,” Kinskey said.

The report was based largely on a three-day series of stakeholder meetings hosted last October by the city and the nonprofit North Main Association. Officials from the Sonoran Institute and the Colorado-based Russell + Mills Studios were also on hand to organize residents’ ideas and transform them into detailed artist renderings of what the new interchange might look like.

Those renderings included features such as a tree-lined entrance to the city, pathway extensions, infrastructure improvements and the construction of a new park that both welcomes visitors and furthers a sort of visual brand for Sheridan.

WYDOT announced in 2010 that the interchange would be relocated roughly three quarters of a mile north of its current location. An official construction start date has yet to be determined, but Bateson told councilors that city staffers’ goal in creating their report was to preempt WYDOT’s design process in order to maximize local say in the project.

He added that WYDOT is looking to begin its bidding process for the project in 2015.

Bateson said the location of the current interchange, which WYDOT has tentatively agreed to provide to the city, could become a high-profile park, if funding is eventually available.

“This could be the destination that gets people off the interstate and into Sheridan,” he said.

Following his presentation, Kinskey charged Bateson with determining exactly how much these design projects would cost so that effective pitches for funding can be made to legislators in Cheyenne.

Bateson said the basic elements of the plan, excluding construction of the proposed park, could cost in the neighborhood of $2 million.

Bateson added that city staff intends to host additional public outreach sessions in the months to come.

Also at Wednesday’s work session, building official Kevin Bare presented the city’s new online permitting system to members of the council.

Touted as an asset for both owners and contractors, the new technology allows Sheridan residents to apply for and check the status of building permits via the Internet. The system also allows users to request inspections and pay for their permits online.

Following the presentation, Ward 1 Councilman John Heath expressed concern that the new system did not make it clear that its PayPal payment option adds an additional charge of 2.2 percent to the permit fee.

Saying he shared Heath’s concern, Kinskey added that the fee could prove burdensome since permits for larger projects can sometimes cost tens of thousands of dollars.

The mayor said city officials might consider reaching out to PayPal in an attempt to resolve the issue.

About

Paolo Cisneros

Paolo Cisneros joined The Sheridan Press staff in August 2012. He covers business, energy and public safety. A Chicago native, he graduated with a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2011.

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