Warmth of friends helped get us through

The storm last weekend really got me thinking.

I’m kind of a pansy when it comes to not having any power.

Most of the time I like to think I could rough it with the best of them. Live off the grid, fetch water from the well and pretend I live on the wild frontier of the West.

But, this weekend kind of knocked me back to reality.

The experience of waking up without power last Friday could be summed up in one word: cold.

I got out of bed, shivering from the bite of the chilly fall air that found its way into the house. I tried the light switch, even though I knew nothing would happen.

I cursed as I stubbed my toes a few times making my way to the living room only to look outside and see our trees drooping from the weight of the heavy snow.

I know I’m not the only person who went through this routine last week.

Even without power I was able to browse Facebook and Twitter on my phone. People were posting photos and stories about their power being out as well. Many of those posts showed broken tree limbs, snow-covered streets and kids enjoying the first white stuff of the season.

It wasn’t so bad at first. Sure, it canceled some events and sort of brought the city to a standstill. But it was kind of fun.

Then 9 p.m. rolled around and my husband and I were still without power.

We weren’t mad. We knew crews for the power company had been out all day working to restore electricity to homes and businesses.

We were mostly trying to decide what to do. Should we sleep at a friend’s house? What would we do with our dog? Should we find a generator so we don’t have to throw away all of our food and our freezer full of meat?

To start, we went to a friend’s to sit in front of their wood-burning stove. Then, we went for pizza and beers since we couldn’t cook.

Finally, we decided to head home. We put our dog’s snowshoeing coat on him, tucked him in under a blanket and then went to sleep ourselves.

It ended up not being too bad. Thanks to the help from friends, we were able to run a generator Saturday so we didn’t lose our perishable goods.

Seems there was a lot of that. Neighbors opened their homes to those without power. Friends helped others clean tree limbs from their yards.

Everyone came together. The warmth of community helped get us all through.

 

Kristen Czaban is the managing editor at The Sheridan Press.

About

Kristen Czaban

Kristen Czaban joined The Sheridan Press staff in 2008 and covered beats including local government, cops and courts and the energy industry. In 2012, she was promoted and now serves as the managing editor for The Press. Czaban has a journalism degree from Northwestern University.

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