Category Archives: National Columnist

Column: A lesson in service from World War II

On April 24, 1944, 2nd Lt. John R. Pedevillano was flying in a B-17 over Nazi territory when the fighters escorting his formation were drawn away in combat, leaving the bombers defenseless against air and ground fire for an hour. Sixteen U.S. planes went down, and Pedevillano — the youngest B-17 bombardier in the 306th… Continue Reading

Column: Readers share savings tips for electronics

In a recent column, I shared the story of my “smart TV” that suddenly wasn’t. We purchased a new television less than three years ago with built-in streaming Internet video features. In April, a message on the screen notified us that the television would no longer support YouTube, even though it was advertised as a… Continue Reading

Coal is part of the answer, not the problem

There are those who believe that wind and solar are the only way forward for energy in a carbon-constrained world. They want to stop coal production and use. That nearly 40 percent of America’s electricity comes from coal while after decades of development and tens of billions of dollars in subsidies, wind and solar contribute… Continue Reading

A legacy of cliches

Discussions of racial problems almost invariably bring out the cliche of “a legacy of slavery.” But anyone who is being serious, as distinguished from being political, would surely want to know if whatever he is talking about — whether fatherless children, crime or whatever — is in fact a legacy of slavery or of some… Continue Reading

Sit back and enjoy the show

Stranger things have happened in American politics, but the sudden surge of Democratic/Populist Bernie Sanders and Republican/Pompulist Donald Trump puts one in mind of alternate universes. And I don’t mean Miss Universes. Both men are holding second place in some polls behind Hillary Clinton and Jeb Bush, respectively. And both are steadily ascending in the… Continue Reading

Column: The wrinkle in the ACA decision

“What chumps!” — Chief Justice John Roberts, June 29, 2015 Roberts’ intellectual complexity does not prevent him from expressing himself pithily, as he did with those words when dissenting in a case from Arizona. Joined by Antonin Scalia, Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito, Roberts’ dissent should somewhat mollify conservatives who are dismayed about his interpretive… Continue Reading

The worst agreement in U.S. diplomatic history

The devil is not in the details. It’s in the entire conception of the Iran deal, animated by President Obama’s fantastical belief that he, uniquely, could achieve detente with a fanatical Islamist regime whose foundational purpose is to cleanse the Middle East of the poisonous corruption of American power and influence. In pursuit of his… Continue Reading

Some GOP candidates becoming unhinged

In 1824, in retirement 37 years after serving as the Constitutional Convention’s prime mover, James Madison, 73, noted that the 1787 “language of our Constitution is already undergoing interpretations unknown to its founders.” He knew that the purport of the text would evolve “with the changeable meaning of the words composing it.” Now, 147 years… Continue Reading

ObamaCare wins one, America loses

EDITOR’S NOTE: This essay first appeared in the June 26 edition of The Wall Street Journal. The Sheridan Press contacted Sen. Barrasso’s office in order to republish for our readership. The Supreme Court’s ruling Thursday in King v. Burwell has temporarily saved the Affordable Care Act, but millions of Americans are still hurting under ObamaCare.… Continue Reading

Column: On lowering the flag

By Charles Krauthammer After a massacre like the one at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, our immediate reaction is to do something. Something, for politicians, means legislation. And for Democratic politicians, this means gun control. It’s the all-purpose, go-to, knee-jerk solution. Within hours of the massacre, President Obama was lamenting the absence of progress on… Continue Reading

Column: The mourning after

By all appearances Friday morning, as thousands lined the street waiting (and wilting) for hours in 90-degree heat to enter the funeral arena where President Obama was to deliver a eulogy for state Sen. Clementa Pinckney, racial unity seemed a comfortable fact of life. For many, no doubt, it is. And numerous conversations the past… Continue Reading

Column: The damaging doctrine of John Roberts

Conservatives are dismayed about the Supreme Court’s complicity in rewriting the Affordable Care Act — its ratification of the IRS’ disregard of the statute’s plain and purposeful language. But they have contributed to this outcome. Their decades of populist praise of judicial deference to the political branches has borne this sour fruit. The court says… Continue Reading

Column: Questions for candidate Clinton

Hillary Clinton’s reticence is drowning out her message, which is that she is the cure for the many ailments that afflict America during a second Democratic presidential term. Sen. Charles Schumer, D-New York, has called her “the most opaque person you’ll ever meet in your life,” but when opacity yields to the necessity of answering… Continue Reading

Column: Love requires the flag come down

In a historic moment, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley called late yesterday for removal of the Confederate Battle Flag from the Statehouse grounds. It was the right thing to do and, to many of us, long overdue. Whatever arguments have been offered in the past for its prominent placement on government property, the massacre of… Continue Reading

Column: From the proprietor’s perspective

If you handed an expired coupon to your cashier and your cashier rejected it, what would you do? None of my area stores accept expired coupons, and I’d never intentionally try to pass one in the checkout lane. I’m actually mortified if I accidentally do hand one over — awhile ago, I had a coupon… Continue Reading

Column: Cut the cord and let Greece go

Now come Greeks bearing the gift of confirmation that Margaret Thatcher was right about socialist governments: “They always run out of other people’s money.” Greece, from whose ancient playwrights Western drama descends, is in an absurdist melodrama about securing yet another cash infusion from international creditors. This would add another boulder to a mountain of… Continue Reading

Column: A time to grieve

Unspeakable, unimaginable, incomprehensible and unthinkable are the words we’ve heard and used to describe the horrific murders of nine African-Americans as they prayed in a Charleston, South Carolina, church, shot by a hate-filled racist on a genocidal purge. These are all we can summon to describe an event that is not human. The shooter, who… Continue Reading

Column: A new strategy for Iraq and Syria

It’s time for a new strategy in Iraq and Syria. It begins by admitting that the old borders are gone, that a unified Syria or Iraq will never be reconstituted, that the Sykes-Picot map is defunct. We may not want to enunciate that policy officially. After all, it does contradict the principle that colonial borders… Continue Reading

Column: Donald Trump: The art of himself

I’m really rich,” Donald Trump informed supporters at his presidential campaign announcement. “I’m proud of my net worth. I’ve done an amazing job.” “I’m really proud of my success. I really am.” “I have the best [golf] courses in the world … I have one right next to the White House.” “One of the big… Continue Reading

Column: Traveling along our path to limited government

By George Will Americans should light 800 candles for the birthday of the document that began paving the meandering path to limited government. Magna Carta laid down the law about “fish weirs” on English rivers, “assizes of darrein presentment,” people being “distrained to make bridges” and other “liberties … to hold in our realm of… Continue Reading

A vote for TPA is not a vote for Obama

Before presidential politics — the game of getting to 270 electoral votes — completely eclipses governing, there is the urgent task of getting to 217 votes in the House of Representatives to pass Trade Promotion Authority (TPA). This would guarantee a vote without amendments on the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement. Without TPA, any trade agreement… Continue Reading

Copyright © 2015 The Sheridan Press or Sheridan Newspapers, Inc.

  • Plan your adventure at! Visit Now