Category Archives: National Columnist

You want hypotheticals? Here’s one.

By Charles Krauthammer Ramadi falls. The Iraqi army flees. The great 60-nation anti-Islamic State coalition so grandly proclaimed by the Obama administration is nowhere to be seen. Instead, it’s the defense minister of Iran who flies into Baghdad, an unsubtle demonstration of who’s in charge — while the U.S. air campaign proves futile and America’s… Continue Reading

Americans reconciling with the labor movement

By DANA MILBANK I am proud to be a card-carrying member of Local 32035 of the Communications Workers of America. It was not always thus. The Post is an open shop, and I dropped my membership several years ago when the union was encouraging readers to cancel their subscriptions to protest some management action. I… Continue Reading

Column: Capital punishment’s slow death

Without a definitive judicial ruling or other galvanizing event, a perennial American argument is ending. Capital punishment is withering away. It is difficult to imagine moral reasoning that would support the conclusion that an injustice will be done when, years hence, the death penalty finally is administered to Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the Boston Marathon terrorist who… Continue Reading

Trigger warnings, colleges and the ‘Swaddled Generation’

Trigger warning: This column will include discussion of ideas that may conflict with your own. Those accustomed to reading or listening only to liberal commentators may not be aware of “trigger warnings” and “safe zones” on college campuses. It seems that mostly conservative sites and writers are concerned with the increasingly draconian suppression of free… Continue Reading

Column: How can we save Obama (on trade)?

By Charles Krauthammer That free trade is advantageous to both sides is the rarest of political propositions — provable, indeed mathematically. David Ricardo did so in 1817. The Law of Comparative Advantage has held up nicely for 198 years. Nor is this abstract theory. We’ve lived it. The free-trade regime created after World War II… Continue Reading

Column: The Internet .Sucks

The U.S. government wants to relinquish control of the Web. But the alternative really dot-sucks. Going back almost to the days when Al Gore invented the Internet, the federal government has been in charge of online addresses through its contract with the California-based nonprofit ICANN (the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers). Now, responding… Continue Reading

Column: The tsunami of gender transition

For many, it was an apocryphal moment. One which will be remembered for a lifetime. Exactly where we were and what we were doing when Bruce Jenner shocked the world by going on television to announce that he is … a Republican. And oh yeah, the transgender thing was sort of a big deal too.… Continue Reading

The apostle Mike Huckabee, onward christian Huckabee

In the 1950s, during one of his two campaigns as the Democrats’ presidential nominee, Adlai Stevenson was invited to address a gathering of Baptists in Houston, where in 1960 John Kennedy would address a gathering of Protestant ministers to refute charges that his Catholicism rendered him unfit to be president. This was an opinion vociferously… Continue Reading

Column: Waging a one-woman crusade against the Muslim world

The recent spectacle of Pamela Geller, the erstwhile journalist who organized a provocative Prophet Muhammad cartoon-drawing contest in Texas, gives pause to even the most passionate defenders of the First Amendment.      Not since Westboro Baptist Church’s “God Hates Fags” message — and Florida’s Quran-burning pastor Terry Jones — has the principle of free… Continue Reading

Column: A performance by Lindsey and the Jets

Sir Elton John, Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire, flew into Washington to testify Wednesday before members of the United States Senate — or, as they might more accurately be described, the Madmen Across the Water. He had been called before an Appropriations subcommittee to speak about the importance of foreign aid,… Continue Reading

Column: Free Willy!

We often wonder how people of the past, including the most revered and refined, could have universally engaged in conduct now considered unconscionable. Such as slavery. How could the Founders, so sublimely devoted to human liberty, have lived with — some participating in — human slavery? Or fourscore years later, how could the saintly Lincoln,… Continue Reading

Patrician blacksmith for president?

America’s smallest state — one Nevada county is nearly eight times larger — has the longest name: In a 2010 referendum, voters kept the official title, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. The state also has a dark-horse presidential candidate who is the only Democratic candidate so far who can shoe a horse. “Put… Continue Reading

Column: Ben Carson’s version of himself

Ben Carson, who formally announced his run for the presidency Monday, is a brilliant surgeon, gifted storyteller and charismatic speaker. But modesty is not among his talents. The retired Johns Hopkins professor’s launch video, nearly five minutes long, positions the aspiring Republican presidential nominee right alongside Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King Jr. “We can… Continue Reading

Painful ironies in race, politics and lies

Among the many painful ironies in the current racial turmoil is that communities scattered across the country were disrupted by riots and looting because of the demonstrable lie that Michael Brown was shot in the back by a white policeman in Missouri — but there was not nearly as much turmoil created by the demonstrable… Continue Reading

Clinton’s Democratic opponents need to smoke her out

By DANA MILBANK Hillary Clinton has had some bad luck lately with revelations about her secret email server and foreign contributors to the Clinton Foundation. But in one crucial area, the front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination has been blessed with abundant good fortune: her opponents. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont on Thursday became the… Continue Reading

Column: Men wielding power in hellish times

“Wolf Hall,” the Man Booker Prize-winning historical novel about the court of Henry VIII — and most dramatically, the conflict between Thomas Cromwell and Sir Thomas More — is now a TV series (presented on PBS). It is maddeningly good. Maddening because its history is tendentiously distorted, yet the drama is so brilliantly conceived and… Continue Reading

Column: Anti-Trust Law and Lawlessness

We all make mistakes and some of us learn from them. What is even better is to learn from other people’s mistakes, where they pay for those mistakes while we learn free of charge. Many Americans who say that we should learn from other people, especially Europeans, mean that we should imitate what they did.… Continue Reading

Column: A Graham candidacy’s fun factor

In 1994, Lindsey Graham, then a 39-year-old South Carolina legislator, ran for Congress in a district that he said had not elected a Republican since Union guns made it do so during Reconstruction. He promised that in Washington he would be “one less vote for an agenda that makes you want to throw up.” He… Continue Reading

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