Memories, shared grief

Home|Opinion|Publisher's Notebook|Memories, shared grief

Authorities in California found the body of Erin Henry, a former Sheridan resident and current Humboldt State University (California) student, Friday morning south of Westhaven, California. Henry was last seen Nov. 25 and reported missing Nov. 30. She was found Dec. 8.

The search for the former Sheridan resident flooded local and California social media pages. Many knew the 22-year-old and wanted to help locate her. That’s a testament to the impact she had on those with whom she interacted.

I worked with Henry at the Powder Horn. I waitressed at the restaurant there for a few years as a second job before I became editor at The Press. She bussed tables. She would laugh and joke with coworkers. She worked hard. She would sing songs from local theater productions with classmates who also worked at the Powder Horn. While I won’t say I knew her well, I worked with her often and was always glad to see her name on the schedule with mine.

I send my most sincere condolences to Henry’s friends and family. She will be missed.

•••••

The Sheridan Press received a nomination for the large business category of the Chamber’s Awards of Excellence. What an honor! As part of that process, the Chamber sends out questionnaires to the nominated businesses. The questions seem simple, but many might understand the complexity that lurks behind the basic inquiries.

For example: Tell me what your organization does. The simple request reminded me of several leadership trainings that forced me to practice my elevator speech — who I am and what I do in a minute or less. There are many ways to explain what it is we do at The Sheridan Press. In many ways, we’re advocates for the community. We arm citizens with the information needed to be active and engaged. We help businesses tell their stories and get people in their doors. We support nonprofits and other local organizations. We seek to hold public officials accountable. We engage area residents in conversations about the happenings about town. We document history.

As I worked to answer the questions put forth by the Chamber, I became reminded of why I’m so proud of the group of individuals with whom I work. We do so much. I’m sure many businesses in the community feel the same way, and rightfully so.

•••••

Project Enterprise continues to come up in conversations around Sheridan. Many express eagerness to know which business Project Enterprise truly is. Some marvel at the amount of money that will be spent to lure the business here.

The Wyoming Business Council recommended approval for a $12,592,090 grant to the Sheridan Economic and Educational Development Authority Joint Powers Board. SEEDA wants to construct a building in the Sheridan High-Tech Business Park, which it will own and lease to Project Enterprise. A local match is required, too. But officials working on the project emphasize that most of the investment will be recouped in lease payments or, maybe, the sale of the building to the company.

Still, the curiosity has certainly been piqued and many have offered guesses. The timeline for the project indicates the community will know in January the name of the company behind Project Enterprise as long as the State Loan and Investment Board approves the funding.

By |December 12th, 2017|

About the Author:

Kristen Czaban has been with The Sheridan Press since June 2008 and has covered the entire gamut of beats including government, crime, business and the outdoors. Before heading west, she graduated from Northwestern University with a bachelor’s in journalism. Email Kristen at: kristen.czaban@thesheridanpress.com

READER COMMENTS